Let's Talk About Cabo:

What's changed, and what we LOVE.


Did you know Cabo receives 360 days of sunshine a year? And when the idyllic weather mingles with increasingly impressive farm-to-table cuisine, chic boutiques, and world-class boating—Cuvée guests find the Baja bliss growing even more, well, blissful.  

Known for pristine azure waters, predictably sunny weather, and panoramic ocean views, Los Cabos has been a vacation destination since the ‘50s, when stylish film stars used the village at the southern tip of Mexico’s 1,000-mile-long Baja Peninsula as a Hollywood hideaway.

Check out what’s changed in Los Cabos in recent years, and why the Baja love affair keeps gaining strength by the day.


Post-Hurricane Facelift

Growing into its tourism future by adding more infrastructure in the 80’s and 90’s, Los Cabos is now undergoing a true renaissance following two recent occurrences: Successful rebuilding after Hurricane Odile, including a second international terminal designed to handle 10 million annual visitors, and the partnership of public and private efforts to improve regional conditions after the US State Department’s Level 2 designation (under its four-tier travel advisory system), the same level now assigned to most of Western Europe including England, France, Germany and Spain.


Safety + Security

The coalition’s $50 million investment in a 5-Point Security Action Plan resulted in 90% crime drop and continued growth with more than $1 billion in hotel investments and upgrades. In 2017, Los Cabos recorded its strongest growth since 2010, making it the fastest growing destination in Mexico with an additional 5% increase in arrivals during the first quarter of 2019 compared to 2018.

We are particularly proud to be part of this vibrant Los Cabos community, where we’ve been in residence for nine years. Our private villas are thoughtfully designed to show off the endless sea and sky to their best advantage, and our local experts know how to guide your every adventure, big or small.

The Water

Like many other coastal communities, a large part of Los Cabos life revolves around the water. Called the “world’s aquarium​” by Jacques Cousteau for its rich marine life, the 700-mile long Gulf of California/Sea of Cortez meets the Pacific Ocean at the bottom of the Baja Peninsula. Because the water depth drops close to the shore, fishing boats can pull in big sailfish without going out very far, and migrating season draws thousands of friendly gray whales for close encounter watching from ship or shore.


Foodies' Paradise

Back on land, the fertile local growing fields and storied culinary heritage attract star chefs like Jean-Georges Vongerichten, while in the foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains, you’ll encounter a strong sense of place at the uniquely charming Flora’s Field Kitchen, with a mission to only serve what they make, raise, and grow on their surrounding organic working farm, harvesting over 200 varieties of vegetables and herbs by hand. In addition, you’ll have your choice of beachside cantinas for margaritas and tacos—the more authentic, the better. But don’t miss the regional iconic crispy fish, a taco that originated in Baja and reflects the important connection between everyday life and the sea.


Bliss in Baja

Luxury Los Cabos Villas