When and Where to Whale Watch in Cabo

Close Encounters of the Whale Kind

There are few aquatic adventures as joyful as watching a pod of friendly gray whales frolicking in the coastal waters off the Baja Peninsula. Called the “world’s aquarium” by Jacques Cousteau for its rich marine life, the 700-mile long Gulf of California, otherwise known as the Sea of Cortez, meets the Pacific Ocean at the bottom of the Baja Peninsula. Because the water depth drops close to the shore, fishing boats can pull in big sailfish without going out very far, and when migrating season draws thousands of whales from December through March, you can see them from land.

Blue + Pacific Gray Whale Season

December through January is the time of year to see Blue whales, the largest animal on the planet, as well as Humpbacks, known for producing a complex series of repetitious sounds, or whale “songs”, which can travel for great distances through the water. But the greatest concentration in the Baja lagoons will be Pacific Gray whales, amazing creatures that make the trip from their feeding grounds in cold Northwestern waters. Often described as the longest known mammal migration in the animal kingdom, the round-trip journey moves the whales through 12,500 miles of coastline, traveling about 80 miles per day.


Watch From Your Cuvée Villa

With Cuvée in Los Cabos, it’s easy for whale watching to become part of your everyday life, because our villas–just steps away from the One & Only Palmilla Resort and consistently at the top of Condé Nast’s “Gold List”, are designed to show off the endless sea. With near perfect year-round weather that makes outdoor living a breeze, you can spot the whales from your outdoor terrace or while floating in your heated infinity pool. With spectacular views, custom fire features, outdoor entertaining systems, and al fresco grilling and dining areas, you can be on whale-watch without leaving your home base.


Watch From Your Own Private Catamaran

Arriving in Baja by late December, Gray whales use the warm waters as their major Pacific calving grounds. Our private catamaran tours are your chance to get closer to these gentle giants, accompanied by a guide who understands whale behavior and knows how to follow the local conservation plan in order to co-exist with these natural wonders. Our luxury catamarans, designed with double hulls to provide maximum stability, enable you to observe the whales being quite active, displaying a range of amazing surfacing behavior. The sight of a 45-foot-long, 40-ton whale leaping out of the water—called “breaching”—will take your breath away. And the whales’ practice of poking their heads vertically above the surface in order to get a better view of their surroundings—a maneuver known as spy hopping—makes it seem as though these astonishing creatures are as curious about us as we are about them.


Watch From The Water

Some devoted naturalists like to enter the water and swim with the whales, described as a transformative and mystical journey. But you can stay on the catamaran for an epic encounter because these fascinating animals will often swim right up to the open boats. Known as “friendlies” by seasoned whale watchers, they are social and engaging, often seeking out human contact by pushing their babies close enough to be petted. No matter how to choose to engage with these whales, the proximity to one of nature’s most phenomenal sights will be an unforgettable experience.


End of Day

At the end of the day, it’s time to reflect on the wonderment of whale watching during a leisurely in-villa evening. Our private chefs will conjure up a meal that represents the very best of local flavor while you enjoy al fresco cocktails and conversation, captivated by a majestic sunset over the Sea of Cortez, right there on the edge of the Baja Peninsula, winter home of the majestic Gray whale.


WHERE TO WHALE WATCH